Wednesday, March 28, 2012

Tracery for W4W

Again, Donna of gardenwalkgardentalk, you are putting us into a state of deep contemplation. It could be good as it is Lent season for most of us here in the country. And it could not be far because you have posted the church photos, which i took to mean i am reminded of putting myself in the presence of the Lord, even if i don't always go to church. Reminders always come from so many ways, it is sensitivity which doesn't always follow. It is just like a reminder about love from a song saying "it comes from the most unexpected places"! 


However, i can't make much for tracery, and my contemplation branched so much into so many things! And in times of adversity, i will just follow your examples. At the end, i hope you will at least be amused. Tracery is a term i just learned through Donna! 

 We don't have your autumn nor your winter, but we also get some semblance of those when some deciduous trees remember the imprints in their genes to shed those leaves, because they are approaching very dry months; ...


 ...or when we are almost at the end of our dry months, and some fruit trees like this avocado did not make it until the rains come. Even the crows, which are among the most intelligent of the birds seem lonely for lack of food.


The frangipani or Plumeria (we call calachuchi here), shed leaves but still full of energy and it is one tree very difficult to kill. It is also very easy to grow even through neglect.

I love the tracery effect of the very early morning sun through the coconut fronds. This tree is maybe the very common symbol for the hot tropics, with lots of beaches and full sun. This reminds me of the colored glasses in churches of old.


 The very distinct venation of a Sanchezia leaf, prominently displays tracery. I am amazed of its brightness, and how the contrasts and brightness of the venation help the plant for its growth and development. I wonder if there are correlations.

 Everybody is very familiar with the strong contrast and patterns of a Caladium leaf. Does this pass also as a tracery effect?


How about this one from a frond of a tropical fern?

 The drooping pattern of a blooming herb!


The very distinct lines and design of butterfly wings (Parantica vitrina), seemingly like the colored glasses in churches and old buildings.

How about a 'holy' vine climbing through the mesh wire? Is the wire considered the tracery?

This is my personal tracery, tracery of the nearby hill profile and very symbolic for me too! It is one of the rainy season sunsets viewed from our house in the province.

 And to complete my mimicking Donna of the types of shots for tracery, i included this nave of the Taal Basilica, or the Basilica of Saint Martin de Tours, a church built in the 16th century, considered the largest in the Far East. The tabernacle is made of silver, and the only one of its kind in the Philippines.


And for my fun shot, i hope you will also be amused by this, a kettle on top of a bamboo pedestal i consider its tracery, placed in front of a restaurant. I don't think there will still be a more meaningful and evocative sign than this one. Would you consider it a tracery too, or a treachery!

21 comments:

  1. Those are some great photos. I love the branch structure photo of the Plumeria.
    Cher Sunray Gardens

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    1. Plumeria is very common here in the tropics, but i don't plant it as traditionally it is associated with funeral flowers!

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  2. Fantastic photos as always Andrea! Would love to have one of those bamboo pedestals!

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    1. Mark, haha, maganda nga kaso nakalagay sa malapit sa karsada, just in front of the restaurant side. I love it too for some knick-knacks inside the house or in the bathroom!

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  3. What beautiful images to illustrate tracery! I especially like the the coconut fronds...lovely! And plumeria is one of my favorite island plants/flowers. I wish we could grow it here...

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    1. Thank you, and your photos are all stunning i wish i took the shots. And yes, this coconut fronds i very much love too.

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  4. You did many fine images of tracery, and I knew palms would be a great garden example. I had shots from the botanical gardens of huge palms. They make a wonderful screen and add mystery to a garden scape by just selectively choosing what you see beyond. The shadow interestingly too. My favorite, was the holy vine. It is a lovely photo and shows the delicate nature of tracery. And you knew I would love the 16th century church. I don't post much architecture on my blog, but being an architect, love the structures. The pot was quite humorous, fun post ender.

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    1. Thanks Donna for the appreciation, you know I always love your challenges and i try hard most times. That holy vine i had second thoughts if i will include it as it looks so unnatural, am glad you like it. It looks like i am gravitated to architects now, as my new friend is an architect-farmer! haha. I remember your palm posts with different colors, yes they are lovely and unique. But i envy the sharpness of your church photos, as mine don't have those qualities. I wish to do like yours too!

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  5. This is the first time I have heard of tracery. I enjoyed your pictures; two pictures stuck out for me -- the picture of the Caladium leaf and the picture of the butterfly.

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    1. Hi Linda, Donna is really teaching us lots of words that we really find very challenging, but we enjoyed it. Thanks for appreciating the caladium and the butterfly, i had fun in putting those here too.

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  6. I found this word evoked a bit of religious contemplation from me, too. Beautiful images. Love the vine growing through the wire. Really so much to see in that one photo. And that church is just gorgeous!

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    1. You and Donna, our contemplator, like that photo of the holy vine on the wire. Maybe that is the architect mind in both of you. Maybe the designs related to churches and the Lent season, induced us to gravitate towards some religious contemplation. Yes i read it in your post too.

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  7. Andrea I love your tracery images...so many gorgeous shots of foliage and critters that bring such a contemplative mood...

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    1. Thanks also Donna, i also very much appreciate your photos in your post. And we both contemplated on the beauty of "organized chaos".

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  8. Hello Andrea,
    gorgeous photos - love learning new terms!
    Kathy

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    1. Thanks for visiting here Kathy. Donna is giving us lots of unusual terms as Word for Wednesday. You should join us next time every 4th week of the month.

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  9. Wonderful selection of shots, Andrea!

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    1. Thank you always Nick for your constant visit. But i always envy your travels.

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  10. Your photos are wonderful and are excellent examples of tracery.

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  11. What great examples you found! It was a challenge wasn't it?! I really like your photos of the palm and caladium. That butterfly is gorgeous!

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  12. The kettle looks most inviting ... impossible to pass by without a cup of tea! So I know which word I would choose!

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